<html>
<head>
<style>
P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body
{
FONT-SIZE: 10pt;
FONT-FAMILY:Tahoma
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><FONT color=#000000>(British)   ---Asda claimed it has pursued an intensive programme of product reformulation to cut the amount of salt in its products. The supermarket has stripped out more than half the salt found in everyday items such as its own brand baked beans (0.7g salt per 100g) white bread (1g salt per 100g), Smart Price pasta sauce (0.7g salt per 100g) and tomato soup (0.5g salt per 100g). <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN><BR>
<SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><FONT color=#000000>By the end of 2006, the supermarket said it had already met the FSA target for salt reduction across at least 65 per cent of its own brand products. <o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN><BR>
<FONT color=#000000><I><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">"Asda is committed to removing a further 156 tonnes of salt from its products in the next twelve months in order to hit the FSA target,"</SPAN></I><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"> said the company in a statement. <o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT><BR>
<FONT color=#000000><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">The Consensus Action on Salt and Health (CASH), a pressure group that aims to encourage the reduction of salt in processed foods, said that the </SPAN><?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" /><st1:country-region><st1:place><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">UK</SPAN></st1:place></st1:country-region><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"> is leading the world on salt reduction, and that many food manufacturers and retailers should be congratulated on the effort they have made. <o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT><BR>
<SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><FONT color=#000000>However, the organisation called for consumers to boycott food that still have large and unnecessary amounts of salt added, reiterating that some products still contain very high levels of salt. <o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN><BR>
<FONT color=#000000><I><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">"In every case there are lower salt alternatives on the market and we now feel that people should boycott these persistently high-salt products," </SPAN></I><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">said Jo Butten, nutritionist for CASH. <o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT><BR>
<FONT color=#000000><I><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">"If sales of these products fall, the manufacturers will be forced to reformulate them, so we would urge shoppers not to buy products that contain either more than 1.25g of salt (0.5g of sodium) per<STRONG> 100g or more than 2.4g of salt per serving," </STRONG></SPAN></I><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><STRONG>she said. <o:p></o:p></STRONG></SPAN></FONT><BR>
<SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><FONT color=#000000><FONT color=#3366ff>Salt is of course a vital nutrient and is necessary for the body to function. It is also a vitally important compound in food manufacturing, in terms of taste and preservation</FONT>. <o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN><BR>
<FONT color=#000000><FONT color=#ff0000><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">But numerous scientists are convinced that high salt intake is responsible for increasing blood pressure (hypertension), a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) - a disease that causes almost 50 per cent of deaths in </SPAN><st1:place><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">Europe</SPAN></st1:place></FONT><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">. <o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT><BR><br /><hr />Check out some new online services at Windows Live Ideas—so new they haven’t even been officially released yet. <a href='http://www.msnspecials.in/windowslive/' target='_new'>Try it!</a></body>
</html>